Fun things to do in and around Pueblo

Pueblo is teeming with unique locations and authentic experiences. And, while it might take more than one trip to Pueblo, here are several Pueblo places that you must see!

El Pueblo History Museum showcases the city's history and the region's many cultural and ethnic groups. The property includes a re-created 1840's adobe trading post and plaza, and the archaeological excavation site of the original 1842 El Pueblo trading post.  

One of America’s castles, the Rosemount Museum was once the house of the Thatcher Family – one of Pueblo’s founding families. The 37-room home is made of Colorado pink volcanic stone and was designed by Victorian architect Henry Hudson Holly of New York City.

Witness a relic of American industry by visiting this treasure, which sits across the Interstate from the still-pulsing steel mill. Blessed with amazing archives and artifacts from everything to former coal town maps to medical equipment, this museum captures a quintessential American story of immigration, industrialization, innovation and conflict.

Pueblo is the hometown of four Congressional Medal of Honor recipients. This memorial honors each of these men with a life-size statue, and includes the engraved names of 3,400 other recipients. Visitors can learn the stories behind each name with a computer database and display inside the Convention Center. The database also features the stories of local veterans who are commemorated on the newly built Veterans Bridge, which sits adjacent to the Convention Center parking lot.

The Arkansas River that slices through Pueblo’s downtown area is a recreation rock star, offering everything from fly-fishing and rafting west of Pueblo to world-class bird watching and fishing at Valco Ponds. For kayakers and boogie boarders, Pueblo’s Whitewater Park is an urban kayak course with eight drops and is surrounded by a collective mural considered the world’s longest public-created art.

This amazing one-man-made castle is part artistry, part craftsmanship and part entertainment. Nestled right along the edge of the San Isabel National Forest, the castle is still a work-in-progress – created only with the heavy labor of artisan Jim Bishop. Bishop is also well-known for his hand-painted signs and spontaneous soliloquies.

The Arkansas River levee is the canvas for the Pueblo Levee Mural Project‚ a 3-mile-long piece of artwork that holds the Guinness Book of World Records’ distinction as being the world’s largest continuous painting. Not bad for some­thing that began 30 years ago as isolated graffiti and was not embraced by the community at large.  

Blessed with water, sunshine and fertile soil, St. Charles Mesa was settled in the late 1800s/early 1900s by mostly Italian immigrants. These families continue to farm the land of their ancestors with world-famous Mira Sol chiles and lots of other farm-fresh wonders. During the growing and harvest seasons, people can visit farms to buy produce and even pick their own.

Nestled in Colorado’s Wet Mountains, this 611-acre mountain park is serenely perfect for year-round hiking, cross country skiing, snowshoeing and stargazing. The Park also hosts guided hikes, camps, yoga getaways, and toddler nature days. The Park’s historic and eco-friendly Horseshoe Lodge also offers amazing woodland accommodations for rejuvenation, exploration or adventure. Just a short drive from Pueblo, the Park lies in the Beulah Valley, a sleepy mountain abode that remains one of Colorado's best-kept secrets.

An impressive tribute to pilots and planes of years past, this museum preserves, restores and displays military aircraft and artifacts that historically represent America’s finest moments in the air.

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