Fun things to do in and around Pueblo

Pueblo is teeming with unique locations and authentic experiences. And, while it might take more than one trip to Pueblo, here are several Pueblo places that you must see!

Just one hour east of Pueblo sits Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site, a reconstructed 1840’s adobe fur trading post on the mountain branch of the Santa Fe Trail where traders, trappers, travelers and Plains Indian tribes came together in peaceful terms for trade. Today, living historians recreate the sights, sounds and smells of the past with guided tours, demonstrations, and special events.

This nationally designated scenic byway climbs from Pueblo's high plains, up through Hardscrabble Canyon into the Wet Mountain Valley, and descends back through the foothills onto the high plains at Colorado City. Along the byway, visitors can stop in Westcliffe, a quaint mountain town, with great shopping, wildflower meadows, intimate views of the Sangre de Cristo mountains, and plenty of summer festivals. Check out Additional Information: FrontierPathways.org Frontier Pathways Itinerary Frontier Pathways Guide Tour Colorado

In a quick day trip just West of Pueblo and Canon City, visitors can marvel at Colorado’s Natural Wonder – a place that brings together the scenic beauty of the Grand Canyon and the human achievement of the Golden Gate Bridge. The Royal Gorge Bridge is America's highest suspension bridge. The park also features the longest single-span Aerial Tram, steepest Incline Railway and the newest thrill ride, the world's highest Skycoaster.

Dine, stroll or enjoy a boat or gondola ride along this river-inspired park. After a devastating flood in 1921, the Arkansas River was diverted to a different location. The Historic Arkansas Riverwalk commemorates the river’s original location with history, public art, interactive fountains, and great events. The international headquarters for the Professional Bull Riders Association also saddles up along the Riverwalk.

Blessed with water, sunshine and fertile soil, St. Charles Mesa was settled in the late 1800s/early 1900s by mostly Italian immigrants. These families continue to farm the land of their ancestors with world-famous Mira Sol chiles and lots of other farm-fresh wonders. During the growing and harvest seasons, people can visit farms to buy produce and even pick their own.

The Pueblo Chile has slowly grown from a local favorite into a phenomenon that attracts chili aficionados from around the world. Visitors to Pueblo make it a point to find sellers of the little green delights, and make sure they have enough to last throughout the year. Now, a new trend in tourism has emerged in Pueblo. The Pueblo Chile is now not only a culinary staple, but an industry that draws adventurers looking for “alternative forms of tourism” from every corner of the planet. Lovers of the Pueblo Chile can now experience it in a whole new way, and experience it at its source in a growing tourism trend known as “Agritourism.”

This amazing one-man-made castle is part artistry, part craftsmanship and part entertainment. Nestled right along the edge of the San Isabel National Forest, the castle is still a work-in-progress – created only with the heavy labor of artisan Jim Bishop. Bishop is also well-known for his hand-painted signs and spontaneous soliloquies.

Searching for a new place to visit? A locale that is: Creative. Historic. Artistic. Look to Pueblo's Creative Corridor!  There’s plenty to explore in Pueblo’s Creative Corridor. Art. Music. Dance. Over an easily navigated area, the Corridor is packed with galleries, museums, street sculptures and fountains, cafés and live music—all ready to challenge your imagination and inspire your visit. 

Witness a relic of American industry by visiting this treasure, which sits across the Interstate from the still-pulsing steel mill. Blessed with amazing archives and artifacts from everything to former coal town maps to medical equipment, this museum captures a quintessential American story of immigration, industrialization, innovation and conflict.

One of America’s castles, the Rosemount Museum was once the house of the Thatcher Family – one of Pueblo’s founding families. The 37-room home is made of Colorado pink volcanic stone and was designed by Victorian architect Henry Hudson Holly of New York City.

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